<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div>Just curious. &nbsp;The contact for <font class="Apple-style-span" color="#4C4BD2"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Inconsolata">find-seconds</font></font> parameter <font class="Apple-style-span" face="Inconsolata"><font class="Apple-style-span" color="#4C4BD2">second</font></font> <font class="Apple-style-span" face="Inconsolata">(integer-in 0 61)</font> instead of <font class="Apple-style-span" face="Inconsolata">(integer-in 0 59)</font>. [1]</div><div><br></div><div>The Java definition of a Date [2] states "<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; ">the values 60 and 61 occur only for leap seconds and even then only in Java implementations that actually track leap seconds correctly," which made me wonder if the values 60 or 61 were actually used by Racket. &nbsp;According to [3], we've had one leap second at the end of 2005 and 2008. &nbsp;Does any PLT Scheme or Racket code actually track or use those leap seconds? &nbsp;I guess if I were using Racket to fire reverse thrusters for re-entry on the space shuttle, I might want to know, since the shuttle moves along at six miles per second.</span></div><meta charset="utf-8"><div><br></div><div>Geoff</div><div><br></div><div><div>[1] Reference:Racket  14.6 Time</div><div>[2]&nbsp;<a href="http://download.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Date.html">http://download.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Date.html</a></div></div><div>[3]&nbsp;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leap_second">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leap_second</a></div></body></html>